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Policy development process: phase 1

NoticeBored - Mon, 04/12/2021 - 7:17pm

On Sunday I blogged about preparing four new 'topic-specific' information security policy templates for SecAware. Today I'm writing about the process of preparing a policy template.

First of all, the fact that I have four titles means I already have a rough idea of what the policies are going to cover (yes, there's a phase zero). 'Capacity and performance management', for instance, is one requested by a customer - and fair enough. As I said on Sunday, this is a legitimate information risk and security issue with implications for confidentiality and integrity as well as the obvious availability of information. In my professional opinion, the issue is sufficiently significant to justify senior management's concern, engagement and consideration (at least). Formulating and drafting a policy is one way to crystallise the topic in a form that can be discussed by management, hopefully leading to decisions about what the organisation should do. It's a prompt to action.

At this phase in the drafting process, I am focused on explaining things to senior management in such a way that they understand the topic area, take an interest, think about it, and accept that it is worth determining rules in this area. The most direct way I know of gaining their understanding and interest is to describe the matter 'in business terms'. Why does 'capacity and performance management' matter to the business? What are the strategic and operational implications? More specifically, what are the associated information risks? What kinds of incident involving inadequate capacity and performance can adversely affect the organization?

Answering such questions is quite tough for generic policy templates lacking the specific business context of a given organisation or industry, so we encourage customers to customise the policy materials to suit their situations. For instance:

  • An IT/cloud service company would probably emphasise the need to maintain adequate IT capacity and performance for its clients and for its own business operations, elaborating on the associated IT/cyber risks.
  • A healthcare company could mention health-related risk examples where delays in furnishing critical information to the workers who need it could jeopardise treatments and critical care.
  • A small business might point out the risks to availability of its key workers, and the business implications of losing its people (and their invaluable knowledge and experience i.e. information assets) due to illness/disease, resignation or retirement. COVID is a very topical illustration. 
  • An accountancy or law firm could focus on avoiding issues caused by late or  incomplete information - perhaps even discussing the delicate balance between those two aspects (e.g. there are business situations where timeliness trumps accuracy, and vice versa).

The policy templates briefly discuss general risks and fundamental principles in order to orient customers in the conceptual space, stimulating them (we hope) to think of situations or scenarios that are relevant to their organisations, their businesses or industries, and hence to their management.

'Briefly' is an important point: the discussion in this blog piece is already lengthier and more involved than would be appropriate for the background or introductory section of a typical policy template. It's easy for someone as passionate and opinionated as me to waffle-on around the policy topic area, not so easy to write succinctly and remain focused ... which makes policy development a surprisingly slow, laborious and hence costly process, given that the finished article may be only 3 or 4 pages. It's not simply a matter of wordsmithing: distilling any topic down to its essentials takes research and consideration. What must be included, and what can we afford to leave out? Which specific angles will stimulate senior managers to understand and accept the premise that 'something must be done'?

OK, that's it for today. Must press on - policy templates to write! I'll expand on the next phase of the policy development process soon - namely, how we flesh out the 'something that must be done' into explicit policy statements. 

 


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Infosec policy development

NoticeBored - Sat, 04/10/2021 - 10:52pm

We're currently preparing some new information risk and security policies for SecAware.com.  It's hard to find gaps in the suite of 81 policy templates already on sale (!) but we're working on these four additions:

  1. Capacity and performance management: usually, an organization's capacity for information processing is managed by specialists in IT and HR.  They help general management optimise and stay on top of information processing performance too.  If capacity is insufficient and/or performance drops, that obviously affects the availability of information ... but it can harm the quality/integrity and may lead to changes that compromise confidentiality, making this an information security issue.  The controls in this policy will include engineering, performance monitoring, analysis/projection and flexibility, with the aim of increasing the organisation's resilience. It's not quite as simple as 'moving to the cloud', although that may be part of the approach.
  2. Information transfer: disclosing/sharing information with, and obtaining information from, third party organisations and individuals is so commonplace, so routine, that we rarely even think about it.  This policy will outline the associated information risks, mitigating controls and other relevant approaches.
  3. Vulnerability disclosure: what should the organisation do if someone notifies it of vulnerabilities or other issues in its information systems, websites, apps and processes? Should there be mechanisms in place to facilitate, even encourage notification? How should issues be addressed?  How does this relate to penetration testing, incident management and assurance?  Lots of questions to get our teeth into!
  4. Clear desks and screens: this is such a basic, self-evident information security issue that it hardly seems worth formulating a policy. However, in the absence of policy and with no 'official' guidance, some workers may not appreciate the issue or may be too lazy/careless to do the right thing. These days, with so many people working from home, the management oversight and peer pressure typical in corporate office settings are weak or non-existent, so maybe it is worth strengthening the controls by reminding workers to tidy up their workplaces and log off.  It's banale, not hard! 
The next release of ISO/IEC 27002 will call these "topic-specific information security policies" focusing on particular issues and/or groups of people in some detail, whereas the organisation's "information security policy" is an overarching, general, high-level framework laying out (among other things) the fundamental principles. Our corporate information security policy template is a mature product that already includes a set of principles, so it may not need changes to comply with the updated ISO/IEC 27002 when published later this year or early next ... but we'll seize the opportunity to review it anyway. 

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